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 It's on! The Labor Conference.

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Veritas

Veritas

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Join date : 2018-07-17

It's on!  The Labor Conference. Empty
PostSubject: It's on! The Labor Conference.   It's on!  The Labor Conference. EmptyFri 14 Dec 2018, 1:27 pm

Quote :
Key issues at Labor's national conference

By Matt Coughlan
Australian Associated Press
32 minutes ago December 14, 2018

KEY ISSUES TO WATCH AT THE ALP NATIONAL CONFERENCE

ASYLUM SEEKERS

The party looks likely to head off a messy debate on refugee issues and avoid major changes to the platform including maintaining boat turn backs and offshore processing. Key Left faction figures Tanya Plibersek, Anthony Albanese and Penny Wong have locked in behind the hardline policy ahead of conference. Debate could centre on increasing Australia's refugee intake, while Labor's parliamentary support for medical transfer legislation is expected to be officially endorsed as party policy. There is also a push to deal with 6000 asylum seekers whose claims were rejected under the "fast-track" assessment process.

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

Expect a heavy focus on the ALP's roots, as unions salivate at the prospect of Labor returning to government. Bringing back industry-wide bargaining is high on the ACTU's shopping list, but how widely Labor adopts the proposal remains to be seen. The Transport Workers Union is calling for aviation to be included, rather than just low-paid sectors. The TWU and the Construction, Forestry, Maritime, Mining and Energy Union want Labor to fast-track superannuation increases and commit to legislating 15 per cent employer contributions by 2030. The Australian Workers' Union, Bill Shorten's alma mater, are behind a push to mandate appointing union representatives on the boards of major private companies. A levy on employers to fund the retraining of workers could also win support.

DOLE

There is growing pressure for Labor to firmly commit to raising Newstart, rather than just its current pledge to have a review into the welfare payment which has been frozen in real terms since 1994. Advocacy groups have called for a $75-a-week increase on the current rate of $275. That would cost the budget $3 billion a year, which could make some reticent to support it with economic management a tried-and-tested attack line the coalition loves to smash Labor with during election campaigns.

ENVIRONMENT

Labor's draft platform contains a pledge to create a new Environment Act in the first term of a Shorten government, as well as establish an Environment Protection Authority and a national environment watchdog. Opponents say those inclusions were a mistake because some elements were not agreed on. The reforms were backed by 470 ALP branches, but opponents will either fight to have them overturned either on the conference floor or by factional agreement. Stop Adani protesters will also be out in force urging Labor to scuttle the proposed Queensland coal mine. Right faction heavyweight and environment spokesman Tony Burke has warned against committing to stop the project.
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Veritas

Veritas

Posts : 627
Join date : 2018-07-17

It's on!  The Labor Conference. Empty
PostSubject: Re: It's on! The Labor Conference.   It's on!  The Labor Conference. EmptyFri 14 Dec 2018, 1:29 pm

Watch this space... this conference will show what the more looney members really want the party to do.
We'll also find out what Bill has promised to stay Leader of the Party.
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Veritas

Veritas

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PostSubject: Re: It's on! The Labor Conference.   It's on!  The Labor Conference. EmptySat 15 Dec 2018, 8:43 am

Quote :
Bill Shorten to set sweeping agenda at Labor Party conference

Simon Benson
National Affairs Editor
Ben Packham
Political Reporter
December 14, 2018

Bill Shorten will tomorrow seek union and party endorsement for his manifesto for government that would fundamentally transform the tax, superannuation and ­industrial relations landscape, remodel the economy and liberalise social policy while strengthening the welfare system.

In the shadow of an election, the Labor leader will front the ALP national conference in ­Adelaide tomorrow with an ­unashamed agenda that would also restore power to the union movement.

The Weekend Australian understands that Mr Shorten will also endorse a change to the ALP’s national platform on superannuation that would include a major crackdown and tougher penalties for employers who don’t meet their superannuation commitments to their workers.

Mr Shorten will address conference delegates tomorrow morning, saying Labor is “united and ready to govern again”.

Senior union figures have told The Weekend Australian they had all but “locked down” potential flashpoints at the conference that could undermine Mr Shorten five months out from a likely May election, which polls suggest Labor will win.

It is likely that the party’s ­border protection policy will be rewritten to include medical evacuations from Nauru and Manus Island to Australia, which the government claims would amount to dismantling offshore processing for illegal boat arrivals.

The move by the Left faction to soften the border policy, which Mr Shorten has already committed to supporting, would effectively ­enshrine a Greens/crossbench policy in the ALP’s national policy ­platform.

While avoiding a factional brawl at the conference, the change to the platform on asylum-seekers will have the potential for the issue to become a central election danger for Mr Shorten.

Mr Shorten’s Right faction appears to have a majority coming into the conference, although the factions are at odds over the extent of his numerical advantage.

Left and Right faction sources told The Weekend Australian the Labor leader would win all key policy arguments, as work continued on negotiated platform amendments aimed at garnering widespread support.

Elements of the Left are pushing for an amendment that would commit Labor to a “substantial increase” in the Newstart allowance within the first term of a Shorten government. The Right is reluctant to be pinned down on the issue, which will have major ­budgetary consequences, and would prefer to review Labor’s policy in government.

On the key issue of refugees and offshore processing, there is likely to be robust debate, but Labor’s pledge to give doctors the power to order medivacs from Nauru and Manus Island, which could be overridden only on nat­ional security grounds, has taken the heat out of the issue.

It’s believed fringe activists will attempt to move platform amendments, including one that would commit to the creation of a refugee processing “queue” in Indonesia. Unapproved amendments will be voted down as the factions close ranks around the leader.

A $75-a-week increase in Newstart has been widely discussed as a “minimum” rise required, but it is understood neither side wants to explicitly nominate a figure in the platform. Left faction delegate Darcy Byrne, who is close to Anthony Albanese, said the factions were seeking to find a consensus position but “there could still be a fight on the floor of ­conference”.

“This is a moral issue and if it does need an argument on the floor to get a resolution then that’s what we will do,” Mr Byrne told The Weekend Australian.

The Right faction claims to have tied up about 200 votes out of 397, with the Left on 178 and 19 unaligned. The Left puts its support at 190, with the Right on 195 and 12 in the middle.

A move to pressure Labor to extend sector-wide bargaining beyond low-paid industries has spilt over into the well-heeled finance industry, as the Finance Sector Union calls for the big four banks to be subjected to industry bargaining after the Hayne inquiry exposed a litany of remuneration-driven scandals.

With an election just six months away, Mr Shorten is ­unlikely to have to rely on his ­majority to bat away electorally unpopular policies.
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Veritas

Veritas

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It's on!  The Labor Conference. Empty
PostSubject: Re: It's on! The Labor Conference.   It's on!  The Labor Conference. EmptySat 15 Dec 2018, 11:50 am

Quote :
CFMMEU takes radical list of demands to Labor national conference
Dana McCauley
14 December 2018

A CFMMEU paper released the day before Labor's national conference outlines a bold list of demands aimed at propping up the union movement, calling on the party to support tax incentives and procurement rules to help boost membership.

The proposed changes, which the powerful Construction, Forestry, Maritime, Mining and Energy Union is pushing to be adopted in Labor's national platform, would overturn Australia's established approach to workplace relations, domestic and international trade.

Opposition Leader Bill Shorten will be forced to weigh the union's demands against the party's broader objectives - and political reality - at its three-day national conference in Adelaide, beginning on Sunday.
The unions have a long list of demands for Bill Shorten at Labor's national conference in Adelaide.

The paper, written by former St Vincent de Paul Society chief executive John Falzon and distributed to conference delegates, calls for a suite of carrot-and-stick measures aimed at bolstering the level of unionisation in the nation's workforce, currently sitting at 15 per cent.

Dr Falzon said the Coalition government had used the power of the state to "try and dismantle organised labour and limit its effectiveness", and that balance must be restored.

"I'm calling for an incoming Labor government to use that state apparatus to encourage and enable the union movement to do what it's designed to do ... to support the union movement as a means of creating a more equal society," he said.

Dr Falzon called for tax incentives to support trade unionism, by making preferential tax rates and concessions dependent upon having a unionised workforce or union agreement.

Legislation across all portfolios, including international trade, would be subjected to an inequality impact test under the proposed changes.

The paper also called for an absolute right to strike to be restored to workers, across employers and industries.

Mr Shorten has promised to consider extending industry bargaining across the economy if Labor wins government, but is yet to unveil a detailed policy.

CFMMEU national secretary Michael O’Connor called on the Opposition Leader to commit to supporting a revitalisation of the unions.

"Labor needs to embrace the fact that governments have a moral responsibility to support the growth of democratic organisations that promote a robust democracy and whose purpose is to advance the interests of working people," Mr O'Connor said.

"This is not simply a call to action for the Labor Party, it is a starting point for a national conversation about the proper role of organised labour in a democratic society.”

Dr Falzon recommended making all government assistance to industry conditional upon companies having union agreements; forcing employers who sponsor migrant worker to sign them onto union agreements; and subjecting all legislation to an inequality impact test.

Federal government procurement rules would be amended to preference companies that have unionised workforces under a proposal that partially echoes a resolution adopted at Labor's Victorian state conference in May.

"This should be modelled, in the first instance, by the Commonwealth Public Service encouraging union membership, proactively making union membership information available to new and existing workers and making staff details available to the appropriate union," Dr Falzon said.

The Victorian branch of the Labor Party's 2018 platform includes a statement that government should use its purchasing power to "generate better jobs and conditions for all Victorians and ensure Labor governments are best practice employers".

It committed to imposing "best practice employment standards" - including "compliance with applicable collective agreements" and "evidence of a local employment strategy" - but stopped short of agreeing to award contracts only to businesses with unionised workers.

Mr O'Connor said the interests of working people had been "drowned out by the greed of big business", with "meaningful and fulfilling jobs ... sacrificed at the altar of flexibility and casualisation".

“Big business has been aided by conservative governments that use the power of the state to oppress and suppress attempts by working people to organise and restore balance and a fair go," he said.

"Record low wage growth and inequality are hurting our economy and our society. Wages will only improve if we improve the voice and bargaining power of workers through strengthening trade unions and increasing trade union membership."
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Veritas

Veritas

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It's on!  The Labor Conference. Empty
PostSubject: Re: It's on! The Labor Conference.   It's on!  The Labor Conference. EmptySun 16 Dec 2018, 2:58 pm

So far the ALP seem to be not so stable and unified at all... so many people disrupting Billy BS and crapping on about Adani.
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Neferti
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Neferti

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PostSubject: Re: It's on! The Labor Conference.   It's on!  The Labor Conference. EmptySun 16 Dec 2018, 6:06 pm

https://www.news.com.au/video/id-5348771529001-5980037197001/protestors-overshadow-shortens-national-conference-address
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Veritas

Veritas

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Join date : 2018-07-17

It's on!  The Labor Conference. Empty
PostSubject: Re: It's on! The Labor Conference.   It's on!  The Labor Conference. EmptyMon 17 Dec 2018, 8:01 am

labor are going to up the Refugee intake to 27,000
great more people to send a minimum of 5 years on the welfare queue.
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Patriot



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It's on!  The Labor Conference. Empty
PostSubject: Re: It's on! The Labor Conference.   It's on!  The Labor Conference. EmptyMon 17 Dec 2018, 9:23 am

And what about the mad as cut snakes Extremist Greenies demands on Labor ?

Greenies ? So what some might say. But it is expected the Greenies will control the Senate if Labor is elected to destroy Australia.

So it will be just like last time with the Greenies controlling Labor.

And a vast armada of leaky boats is assembling over there just waiting for the announcement that Labor has won the election!!!
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Veritas

Veritas

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PostSubject: Re: It's on! The Labor Conference.   It's on!  The Labor Conference. EmptyMon 17 Dec 2018, 6:33 pm

WOW
Labor isn't going to increase the refugee numbers to 27,000 after all...

They are going to raise it to 32,000...

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Neferti
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Neferti

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PostSubject: Re: It's on! The Labor Conference.   It's on!  The Labor Conference. EmptyMon 17 Dec 2018, 7:22 pm

Veritas wrote:
WOW
Labor isn't going to increase the refugee numbers to 27,000 after all...

They are going to raise it to 32,000...


IF they must, they should make, absolutely sure, that the "refugees" (once approved) are sent to Adelaide and Perth and perhaps Brisbane ....

Sydney and Melbourne are FULL and nobody wants to live in Canberra (thankfully) laugh
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Veritas

Veritas

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It's on!  The Labor Conference. Empty
PostSubject: Re: It's on! The Labor Conference.   It's on!  The Labor Conference. EmptyWed 19 Dec 2018, 2:19 pm

Quote :
Labor conference: Shorten’s fixes fine for opposition, but not government
Paul Kelly
December 19, 2018

Here is modern Labor on display — or more accurately not on display — at the 48th ALP national conference at a time when social democratic parties around the world are dying, their ideologies busted and their supporters disillusioned.

Australian Labor has survived and thrived in this age of global political disruption, testimony to its institutional strength, grassroots activism and the quality of its frontbench. Labor is riddled with contradictions but those contradictions have become a strength: it is a bizarre blend of special interests, activist causes, populism dressed as idealism, hard-headed compromises, ambition and ­manipulation, and after 120 years of extraordinary history it is still possessed by deep self-belief.

The focus of this conference was Bill Shorten, once an improbable leader, long denigrated by his internal rivals, uninspiring to the public but now on the verge of victory. The party has closed ranks behind Shorten and Shorten has grown in stature. Labor is thirsty for executive government. The upshot has been a disciplined conference, factional fixes and unity on the floor.

Shorten, whose hold on leadership was fragile just six months ago, has passed two tests essential for a successful ALP leader: he has a commanding lead over the government and he has kept the ALP together at a time when it could have fallen apart. The message from this conference is that Labor will not self-destruct in the final six months. It will retain its nerve, its public unity and its boldness.

Labor’s critical decision in ­opposition has been to shun a “small target” strategy and go bold.

The Morrison government still hopes to nail Labor over its negative gearing and franking credits policies, so the jury remains out. But to this stage boldness has worked for Shorten.

The mix of technological change, cultural transformation, economic resentment and hostility towards elites in the West means parties of the Left and Right have gone radical. Labor has shifted to the Left and, so far, has managed those risks. This is the central policy message from the 48th national conference.

Shorten has been under­estimated. He has a good ear for public sentiment, clever rhetoric, astute management of the party and unions, and a willingness to consult. He runs on the two golden threads the Coalition has lost — unity and stability.

Yet Shorten’s flaw is writ large. He panders to interest groups, progressive causes and the trade unions. He says what people want to hear. He buys short-term support for long-run problems. He raises multiple expectations that cannot be delivered in office.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in industrial relations where, in his final-day intervention, Shorten pledged the trade unions a new bargaining system for a new age, declared the failure of enterprise bargaining — the vital reform of the Keating government — and left ACTU secretary Sally McManus a happy union leader as she left Adelaide.

The signs are everywhere: Shorten emerges as a successful opposition leader whose tactics ­accumulate a toll of woe for Shorten as prime minister. The dilemma facing the Coalition is not just defeat but defeat by Labor with a radical agenda that has won the battle of ideas to this point by enshrining the notion of inequality. The 2019 election is a “change of direction” choice for Australia.

Labor senses this moment.

This is a different Labor Party. The party has changed in response to grassroots activism, social media, individual empowerment, the rise of single-issue campaigns and the enhanced political clout of the unions. Labor is becoming an umbrella party that draws on ­institutional trade union power, environmental activism, the LGBTIQ community, a litany of progressive causes and the big demographics of the youth vote and the women’s vote.

The conference venue is filled with stalls promoting causes, some separate from Labor, others part of the ALP; witness Rainbow Labor, the Labor Environmental Action Network, Labor for Refugees, Emily’s List, the Australian Conservation Foundation, the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples, Friends of the ABC, the Australia Institute, the Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons and Labor Friends of Palestine.

These pressure groups help to tie the party to a fragmented Australian community and anchor Labor to the progressive Left of politics. But the single greatest ­dynamic within the party is the union movement, where ­McManus sings the praises of Shorten, denouncing stagnant wage levels and declaring the unifying Labor theme of a “Fair Go” is akin to “our national identity”.

Conference was largely a policy-free zone, devoid of any serious policy debate, genuflecting before deals and compromises based on cross-factional agreements.

But Shorten’s final-day speech embraced the rhetoric and spirit of the ACTU and he offered a bargaining framework that will give the unions hope and will alarm business.

On display was a bittersweet contrast of Shorten the man and politician. He dreams of being a young Bob Hawke. He wants to be the leader of consensus, bringing unions and employers together in dialogue, finding new pathways to peace, yet Shorten, because of power realities, is conscripted to champion trade union power.

A conscript of history, he feels he has no choice but to back a pro-union, anti-employer shift in the industrial system.

Signalling the potential for a confrontation with employers, Shorten said “enterprise bargaining is not doing the job”. He said the laws of demand and supply in the labour market were broken: the new jobs created by economic growth were insecure and casual jobs. The enterprise bargaining system now rewards wage cuts and job insecurity.

Shorten sounded like McManus. “We need a new system,” he said. He pledged a new wages policy to deliver the fair go. He warned a Shorten government would not be a “re-run of the Hawke-Keating Accord”. The world of 1983 was long gone.

Shorten pledged to restore Sunday penalty rates, to tackle the gender pay gap in large feminised industries and redefine casual work. Opposition workplace relations spokesman Brendan O’Connor told conference that Labor would support industry-wide bargaining when enterprise bargaining failed. This has one aim: to increase union power to offset the fall in union membership.

O’Connor said “every worker” would have access to appropriate bargaining. This opens the option for industry bargaining beyond just the low paid.

Unsurprisingly, Australian Industry Group chief Innes Willox expressed alarm that Labor had also left open industry-wide strike action and warned business and employees would be at risk.

Apart from the unions, the most conspicuous activist group at conference was the green T-shirted LEAN lobby, an organisation formed about 15 years ago by frontbencher Jenny McAllister in a pioneering move that introduced activist lobbies into the party. LEAN was prominent at the previous conference in securing a 50 per cent renewable energy target. It was influential at this conference in securing the rewriting of environmental law and the creation of a proposed federal environment protection authority, though it failed to secure a more ambitious agenda from environment spokesman Tony Burke.

McAllister tells this column her aim had been to attract more people to Labor and that 15 years later LEAN “does just that”. She says it is “incredible” to see the growth in LEAN members at conference and to know there is a group coming from ALP branches around the country to promote environmental policy.

The refugee policy is a showcase for the compromises Shorten must negotiate with the Left and refugee lobby. Boat turnbacks to secure the borders remain in a policy now turning into a political offensive against the Coalition on compassion grounds; witness Labor’s pledge to increase the refugee and humanitarian intake to 32,000 annually.

Labor is top-heavy with deals and fixes to keep its election winning trajectory on course but holding this structure together in office seems hardly tenable.
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