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 That fool Phelps...

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Veritas

Veritas

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Join date : 2018-07-17

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PostSubject: That fool Phelps...   That fool Phelps... EmptyThu 07 Feb 2019, 7:10 am

Quote :
Phelps medivac bill a national security risk, ASIO warns
Simon Benson
NATIONAL AFFAIRS EDITOR
February 7, 2019

Intelligence agencies are understood to have warned in a classified briefing to the government that the “third pillar” of the ­nation’s border-­protection architecture — the offshore ­processing of asylum-seekers — would be dismantled if Kerryn Phelps’s medivac bill ­becomes law.

The Australian understands that the briefing from the Department of Home Affairs, based on advice from ASIO and Australian Border Force, specifically referred to the threat to the “third pillar” of border control policy, which operates alongside boat turnbacks and temporary protection visas.

The classified briefing is understood to have provided ­detailed advice on the need for mothballed detention centres in Australia to be reopened to ­accommodate transfers of people who were unable to be subjected to a timely threat assessment or those deemed not safe to be ­allowed to live in the community.

The advice warned that up to 1000 asylum-seekers on Manus Island and Nauru would be expected to start arriving “within weeks” of the bill being given royal assent, and being transferred within another four to five weeks.

The reopening of the Christmas Island regional processing centre may have to be considered ahead of a possible revival of ­people-smuggling. A declassified briefing note provided to The Australian yesterday said that Dr Phelps’s bill would render the government powerless to conduct proper security threat assessments or stop transfers to the mainland.

Labor, the Greens and other crossbenchers have said they are inclined to support the bill when parliament resumes next week for the first time this year. Crossbencher Rebekha Sharkie will meet the Prime Minister this week after ­accepting an offer from his office for a briefing.

Ms Sharkie received the offer late on Tuesday after she confirmed her intention to support the legislation while also remaining open to discussing amendments with the government.

In addition to the offer of a briefing, the letter outlined why the government opposed Dr Phelps’s proposal to put two doctors in charge of advising whether asylum-seekers should be transferred off Manus Island and Nauru on medical grounds.

The redacted version of the ­security advice said that, under existing national security legislation, which defines security as espionage, sabotage, foreign interference and communal violence, the Department of Home Affairs would be unable to stop transfers of people with criminal records, including rape, pedophilia or murder.

The advice said a flaw with the bill was that the new definition of a “relevant transitory person” would mean Australia would be responsible for those already resettled in Papua New Guinea, including children born to transferees and citizens of PNG. This would “impinge” on the sovereignty of Australia’s neighbour.

“In its current form, the Home Affairs Legislation Amendment (Miscellaneous Measures) Bill 2018 would undermine regional processing and compromise Australia’s strong border protection regime,” the redacted advice said. “The bill would enshrine into law processes for the transfer of certain transitory persons in regional processing countries to Australia for a medical purpose. This could result in all transferees in regional processing countries being brought to Australia within a short period of time. The bill takes the decision-making power for border security out of the hands of government and places it in the hands of medical practitioners. These practitioners may be consulting the person remotely.”

The amendments passed the Senate last year with the support of Labor and the Greens.

The thrust of the Phelps bill is to take medical transfer decisions away from the department and give them to two or more independently appointed doctors. The home affairs minister would retain the power to refuse a transfer on national security grounds. However, under the ASIO Act 1979, security is narrowly defined by threats to the homeland, including sabotage, espionage, ­attacks on defence, and politically motivated violence, but not on other criminality.

The agencies argue that because the minister would have 24 hours to refuse an entry, ASIO would not have enough time to conduct a proper security threat assessment. This would be particularly acute for arrivals of people largely unknown to agencies.

“The amendments in the bill currently provide very limited timeframes for decisions on transfer to be made (within 24 hours) which seriously limits the ability to undertake security and background checks,” the briefing said.

It added that the amendments provided the minister with a limited basis for refusing the transfer of “a relevant transitory person on security grounds if their initial decision to refuse transfer is not agreed to by the independent health advisory panel”. “That is where the minister reasonably believes that the transfer of the person would be prejudicial to security within the meaning of the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation Act,” it said. “This is a very high threshold.”

The advice confirms the government’s claim the Phelps bill would end offshore processing.

The government faces a likely defeat in the lower house, with Labor and the Greens saying they would support the bill and Bob Katter the only crossbencher to say he would vote against it.

Mr Morrison this week announced the government was creating a medical review panel consisting of doctors appointed both independently and by government but it would be limited to providing recommendations and reviews of departmental decisions related to medical transfers.

The government would retain control of all decisions. The Prime Minister said the medical review panel was being established to strengthen the system which was being exploited. Bill Shorten said he was still inclined to support the Phelps bill but was open to considering the government’s plan for a medical review panel.

Bloody Bill Shorten what an idiot... not quite as stupid as Phelps and Sharkie but hey still right up there.
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Neferti
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Neferti

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PostSubject: Re: That fool Phelps...   That fool Phelps... EmptyThu 07 Feb 2019, 3:55 pm

Did I hear Morrison say that if this bill is passed, he will ignore it? That's fine but if Shortarse gets in .... the rickety boats are already getting the barnacles removed in readiness ... God help us all.

This next Election will be a real bun-fight ... lots of "independents" wanting to say a word or three. What a bloody mess it will be!

disgust
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Bobby2

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PostSubject: Re: That fool Phelps...   That fool Phelps... EmptyThu 07 Feb 2019, 8:01 pm

Neferti wrote:
Did I hear Morrison say that if this bill is passed, he will ignore it? That's fine but if Shortarse gets in .... the rickety boats are already getting the barnacles removed in readiness ... God help us all.

This next Election will be a real bun-fight ... lots of "independents" wanting to say a word or three. What a bloody mess it will be!

disgust

In Malaysia and Indonesia they are finishing off
the engine rebuilds & the sealing up of the leaky old boats.
I expect the boats to arrive in the 1000s under Labor.
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Veritas

Veritas

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PostSubject: Re: That fool Phelps...   That fool Phelps... EmptyTue 12 Feb 2019, 8:55 am

Security in clumsy hands of ignorant independents
Jennifer Oriel
February 11, 2019

Australian democracy is being compromised by a small group of independents which wields disproportionate power in the house. The group of MPs is proposing that the bipartisan approach to strong border security be dismantled. It wants ­unelected medics to enjoy discretion over who enters Australia.

Independents once were considered a viable alternative to traditional party politics. But as their power has increased they have become opportunists who act as scavengers on the body politic. They exploit declining public trust in government to capitalise on disaffected voters. They use wedge politics to divide the major parties on policies that exist to protect the national interest. The astonishing abuse of power contradicts crossbenchers’ claim to represent the sensible centre.

Kerryn Phelps is a newly minted independent MP who thinks doctors should have the power to determine what refugees and asylum-seekers can enter the country. It is unclear how a health degree confers the expertise required to manage border security, but the idea has taken hold in progressive circles. The next great leap forward in Western medicine is club medic, where doctors without voters manage Australian borders.

The independents are enthusiastic about dismantling Australia’s rational ­approach to border security. Phelps’ proposed medical evacuation bill would amend the Migration Act so medics can order the transfer of asylum-seekers and refugees from offshore processing centres to the mainland. Labor and the Greens supported the passage of the bill through the Senate. They ridiculed advice from Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton that handing power over border security to unelected ­officials was a risk to national security.

The Australian Security Intelligence Organisation and the Australian Government Solicitor have raised serious concerns about the medical evacuation bill. The solicitor advised Scott Morrison that giving control to doctors would “drastically limit” ministerial discretion over who can enter Australia. In a declassified briefing note provided to The Australian, ASIO has warned the medivac bill “would render the government powerless to conduct proper security threat assessments or stop transfers to the mainland”.

Despite expert warnings, some refuse to acknowledge the threat posed by the Labor and Greens-backed bill. They contend it poses no risk because people granted refugee status already have passed background checks. But many criminals are granted refugee status because asylum-seeker vetting is so complex.

People-smugglers and their cargo often destroy documentation prior to arriving in their country of choice to gain refugee status preventing authorities’ conducting criminal history checks.

They are well-trained in the art of deception. There is so much evidence of criminal evasion in asylum-seeker populations that the conmen have earned the name fake refugees. We pay for their vetting. We pay for their housing. We pay their legal fees, education and medical costs. We pay for their resettlement. We pay for their welfare.

While genuine refugees should be considered for resettlement in Australia, we should not entertain the fantasy that refugee status is evidence of sound character.

In 2017, the government reported boat arrivals were claiming $250 million a year in welfare income support alone while thousands declined to provide information about their identity or apply for refugee status. Most of the 7500 asylum-seekers had entered Australia under the Labor government. Dutton said it had cost more than $13.7 billion to process 50,000 asylum-seekers who arrived on boats after Labor weakened border security.

The proposed medivac bill reflects a mixture of arrogance and incompetence among politicians, many of whom lack ­experience in government policymaking. Apparently, they didn’t bother with the proper checks and balances to ensure it would serve the national interest.

If the political Left had done due diligence on the bill, it would have consulted the relevant authorities and discovered its fatal flaws.

For example, the government has exposed a loophole in the ASIO Act 1979 which defines security as threats to the homeland, including espionage and politically motivated crime but excluding other forms of criminality. In effect, the medivac bill could permit paedophiles, rapists and murderers to enter Australia if they were classified as refugees and unelected medics ordered their evacuation from offshore processing centres.

Late last week, Labor shifted its position on the bill as numbers were circulated showing it would cost $1.4bn by 2023. Most of the cost — $1.2bn — would be for reopening and managing the Christmas ­Island detention centre. As reported in The Australian, the Department of Home ­Affairs believes most of the 1000 individuals living on Nauru and PNG would try to enter Australia on medical grounds if the medivac bill becomes law.

The hubris of the independents is staggering. They expect Australians to pay $1.4bn for a policy that will green light the people-smuggling trade and put unelected medics in charge of who enters the country.

And they have the gall to demand that the government of the day conforms to their destructive demands. Key independent Rebekha Sharkie took a predictably populist line on the proposed bill, saying she “trusts the doctors over the politicians”.

When The Australian asked about Sharkie attending a prime ministerial briefing about it, her spokeswoman said: “We don’t know what the government is going to propose. Sometimes you go to these briefing meetings and they don’t move at all, they just use it as another opportunity to tell you what they’re thinking.”

Why should a government with internationally recognised expertise in border security compromise for crossbenchers who lack the requisite expertise to craft policy in the national interest?

Australians cannot afford to pay billions for queue-jumping, country-shopping asylum-seekers who cheat the system and deprive genuine refugees of sanctuary. But the independents want more of our money to prop up unsustainable border policy.

The government has a golden opportunity to expose Labor’s record of incompetence on border security. If Labor and the Greens want to provoke an early election over the malformed medivac bill, give them just enough rope.
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Neferti
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Neferti

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PostSubject: Re: That fool Phelps...   That fool Phelps... EmptyTue 12 Feb 2019, 9:39 am

Wasn't there one "asylum seeker" who was transferred to Brisbane (?) for urgent medical treatment, not so long ago?  Turned out that all that was wrong was constipation and a suppository would have fixed that and saved us a lot of money.  Phelps is an idiot.
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Neferti
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Neferti

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PostSubject: Re: That fool Phelps...   That fool Phelps... EmptyTue 12 Feb 2019, 9:47 am

Oh, and politicians (and the general public) should realise that there isn't any "public money", it comes from us taxpayers and should be used wisely, not frittered away on all sorts of rubbish and bribes when an election is on the horizon!
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Patriot



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PostSubject: Re: That fool Phelps...   That fool Phelps... EmptyFri 08 Mar 2019, 11:38 am

The "independents" are usually just tools of GetUp! and/or the Extremist Greenies.

Lame duck Phelpsy is a pseudo Greeny who is just being used by the Extremist Greenies to try to get the BOATS RESTARTED.
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