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 Prime Minister, Scott Morrison

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Neferti
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PostSubject: Prime Minister, Scott Morrison   Sat 25 Aug 2018, 9:11 am

Why did they have the spill?

Turnbull's lefty direction was tearing them apart.

With two contenders, who did they elect?

The one closest to Turnbull.

They won't unite to fight Shorten.

They'll continue to fight each other.

Only one winner today.

UPDATE


If Morrison hints at "steady as she goes, get united, bickering is behind us" bullshit they are finished.

He has to disown Turnbull - and mean it. He needs to take immediate, tangible action.

If he comes out with a stark and bold differentiation he might have a chance.

He should immediately and urgently:

Put Tony Abbott in the Cabinet
Make Abbott responsible for attacking Shorten
Dump Paris.
Dump renewables subsidies.
Prioritise price over emissions for power
Scrap the NEG.
Cut immigration.
Slash bureaucracies in Climate, Innovation etc.
Review the Great Barrier Reef grant.
Slash foreign development aid

http://www.michaelsmithnews.com/2018/08/what-just-happened-this.html
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PostSubject: Re: Prime Minister, Scott Morrison   Sat 25 Aug 2018, 9:18 am

IDEOLOGICALLY MALLEABLE, MAYBE
… in ScoMo we must trust ....


The elevation of Scott Morrison will not please all Conservatives. But it’s the best that can be expected considering that Turnbull’s disregard for convention gave the Dutton haters time to garner votes in the second rundown ballot after the hapless Stick Insect ran as a pacer.

But no need to gnash teeth or slash wrists, ScoMo has runs on the board as a Right of Centre operator. He loyally did the job with Sovereign Borders that Abbott gave him and then loyally served Turnbull well in Treasury. He gets the job done, and he's good at it.

We cannot expect the ABC to be sold off, nor can we expect Islamic immigration to be stopped. We cannot expect to see the Paris Accord dumped considering that Friedanegg is now his deputy. But we can expect to see both quietly wander away from the worst of Paris.

Both are deeply religious and both have a love for Oz.

It’s to be hoped that the guidance they seek from above will be followed because God knows Paris is the devil incarnate. The blind addiction to the Global Warming God of the Left that Turnbull worshipped has gone and a fresh look at the reality of energy is on the cards.

If I am wrong I will apologise but I do believe we will now avoid the worst of Green and hard Left Labor’s excesses. He may be a fraction pink but I see him as a Conservative, pragmatic, sleeping socialist.

Chins up… Dutton did not have the majority he needed after all and Turnbull gave his offsiders the time they needed after they threw their hats in the ring. The runoff was always going to be his downfall as Turnbull supporters (40 of them) switched their votes to ScoMo.

Turnbull has won this round and has left the Liberal Party in the mess he wanted. My predictions of Turnbull’s partnership with Shorten are borne out by Shorten’s incredibly soulful eulogy to his “Liberal” partner Turnbull who had joined him on the path to a UN New World Order.

It was a loving requiem that has not come from the Liberals, but from Labor, and indicates Turnbull's partnership with the Left at the expense of Liberal values.

And thank God Turnbull has gone so we can now sleep a little sounder sans nightmares.  

http://pickeringpost.com/story/ideologically-malleable-maybe/8492


Last edited by Neferti on Sat 25 Aug 2018, 9:23 am; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: Prime Minister, Scott Morrison   Sat 25 Aug 2018, 9:22 am

The Canberra political nonsense has to end for all our sakes.

IF you don’t show up to vote in Australia on Election Day, you can expect to get a fine in the mail. Voting in this country is compulsory. But politicians listening to voters? Apparently that’s voluntary.

What we’ve learnt these past few years, culminating with this week’s leadership spill, is that in Australia the rules that the rest of us have to live by don’t seem to apply to politicians.

That they haven’t lived up to their side of the bargain has led to the diminishing of our faith, not just in our political parties, but in our political institutions and the system as a whole. It’s taken us to a dangerous place, where people shrug their shoulders and have given up caring, when really, we should care more than ever before.

Australians are sick of leadership spills, but our dissatisfaction runs deeper than that. We’re sick of the whole political game. Because although it’s a game for the politicians — tallying numbers like a scoreboard at the footy – for the rest of us, real life goes on.

Farmers suffering through drought? That’s real life, not a game.

Pensioners shivering through winter because they’re terrified of their heating bill for using their heater? That’s real life, not a game.

Young people who’ll never afford a home in a major city? That’s real, too.

This week’s leadership spill is only the latest chapter in our recent political history where we’ve seen that the real-life consequences experienced by the rest of us just don’t apply to politicians.

This past year, 15 members of parliament either resigned or were ruled ineligible by the High Court because they didn’t follow the rules and had failed to renounce their foreign citizenships. Not one or two. Fifteen. Careless with their paperwork and responsibility, they were still paid for the time they sat in Parliament without legitimacy. They didn’t have to pay back a cent. Their ineptitude cost us millions in by-elections and High Court hearings.

Ask someone who’s had their Centrelink payments overpaid how eagerly the government claws it back. Every last dollar and all the cents too. One rule for politicians, another rule for everyone else.

In June, politicians got a pay rise taking their base salaries to just under $200,000. It kicked in the same day that penalty rates were cut. Regular workers haven’t seen wage growth in years. One rule for politicians, another rule for everyone else.

But it’s not just unfairness and inequality that has politicians on the nose.

The broken system that they can take advantage of is a huge part of the problem.

Look at the Senate. At the ballot box, we’re handed papers so enormous and confusing they can’t possibly be read. Out of confusion, most people just put a “1” above the line and hope for the best, their votes decided by party preference deals.

Senators get voted in on party tickets, and then switch parties anyway. Cory Bernardi made sure he was on the Liberals ticket in 2016. Once in, he served briefly as an independent, before starting his own party, Australian Conservatives. No one has ever voted for this party in the Senate, yet it has its own Senator. Five other senators have also switched parties after being elected and there’s nothing we can do. How is that fair?

In the House of Representatives, we’ve become used to the leadership spills that decide who’ll be the prime minister. Never mind who was the leader at the election, they’ll change their minds on a whim anyway. New leaders bring new policies, of course. These days, we never get what we were originally sold. If a small business does that to a customer, they end up at consumer affairs. Again, its one rule for politicians, another rule for everyone else.

Friday’s vote didn’t resolve the leadership issue, it just spat out another prime minister to hold the fort until the next one. We know that by now. The same politicians and commentators who circled the ousted Malcolm Turnbull will circle Scott Morrison. They won’t think twice about it.

And even if he isn’t torn down before an election, neither he, nor a Labor leader either, can promise with any real conviction that they’ll deliver the policies they offer to us. We’re used to a system now where trust has been obliterated. We’ve seen the switch played on us time and time again. For them it's a game, for us it’s real life.

If there is one positive of this week, and these years of chaos, it’s that we can better see their true colours. We see our leaders standing beside a friend one day who they’ll throw to the wolves the next, for their own self-interest, vanity, ego or narcissism. We know now they will only pull the knife from the back of one colleague to plunge it into another. They couldn’t be more disingenuous, they couldn’t be more disloyal. If they’re disloyal to friends, what chance do we have of them being loyal to us? Our job now, having been scorned so frequently, is not to shrug our shoulders and look away, but to look closer.

“We’ve all got to live by the rules in this country,” Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in his first press conference yesterday.

We live by the rules, but all too frequently, he and his colleagues don’t.

The first step to mending the system, will be politicians showing us they can live by them too. They’ll be judged by their actions, not by their words.

Chris Urquhart is a freelance journalist.

https://www.news.com.au/finance/work/leaders/the-canberra-political-nonsense-has-to-end-for-all-our-sakes/news-story/07e1e594dd00e7d016822322c2309828
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PostSubject: Re: Prime Minister, Scott Morrison   Sat 25 Aug 2018, 10:07 am

Good articles neferti... hard to disagree with anything that was said
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PostSubject: best article of these posts Nefertiti   Sat 25 Aug 2018, 3:50 pm

Must cangratuclate you on your post Nefertiti, quite agree with everything you say. However so far as people saying to ditch the Paris agreement, don't they realise the importance or maybe the science behind the Climate Change agreements? Ofcourse there have been changes in climates over the centuries, but this one is different, here is just one article of information regarding this https://jancovici.com/en/climate-change/predicting-the-future/how-do-the-present-temperatures-compare-to-the-past-ones -  easy enough to find other  information as well.
Also I simply don't understand why on earth the Libs. have done what they have done. talk about giving Labor a good change of getting in next election, just doesn't make any sense to me at all - talk about self destruction.  Just hope that Scott Morrison manages to somehow bring the party together.
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PostSubject: Re: Prime Minister, Scott Morrison   Sat 25 Aug 2018, 5:09 pm

No one I repeat no one has made a successful prediction on climate yet not even on weather.

The THEORY is still unproven BTW and just a theory.

Climate is much more complex than just CO2.

Records do not go back that far.

Progs ignore past records that do not suit their arguments.

Meanwhile back on topic...

M.Turnbull Progressive PM 2018/8/24



I want to thank the Australian people for the support they've given me and my government over the last nearly three years. We've been able to achieve as a progressive government, as a progressive Liberal coalition government, enormous reforms and very, very substantial achievements.



The Libs are supposed to be a Conservative voice, we already have 2 Progressive voices in our polity...  the ALP and The Greens.
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PostSubject: Re: Prime Minister, Scott Morrison   Sat 25 Aug 2018, 10:55 pm

Morrison can unite a splintering Liberal Party

By Tom Switzer
24 August 2018 — 4:49pm


The Liberal Party, which has produced two of our nation’s greatest prime ministers, this week resembled nothing so much as a pub brawl. Everyone, however grand or obscure, felt entitled to join in.

Talk has been rife that the party of Robert Menzies and John Howard will split. Unless Liberals regain their will to govern and their ability to connect with the Australian people, that fate looks frighteningly likely.
 
A useful cliche holds that every cloud has a silver lining. If so, the resolution of the Liberal leadership stand-off offers the chance of a way forward for the party.

The mainstream of conservative opinion did not believe that Malcolm Turnbull represented them and what they believed in. He was always out of kilter with them, irreparably so, and there was no point in his prolonging the agony. The party leadership and administration had its head in the sand over just how disaffected many one-time Liberals were. At the 2016 election, about a million conservatives refused to cast votes for the Liberal party.


Now all Scott Morrison has to do is to sort out the ghastly mess he has inherited. Of course, the new Prime Minister must bring into his team people from all wings of the party. But they have to accept that the Liberal Party, as Peter Costello says, is the custodian of the centre-right tradition. That means inviting both Tony Abbott and Peter Dutton to high-level cabinet posts.


Morrison is highly experienced. As immigration minister from 2013 to 2015, he toughened up border protection to boost public confidence in our successful, non-discriminatory immigration intake. (The US and Europe are in awe.) And as treasurer from 2015, and notwithstanding an interventionist budget in 2016, he pushed pro-growth policies to capitalise on the record jobs surge and infrastructure boom.


A sound governing agenda would include conventional Liberal policies, such as cutting tax and spending, strengthening law and order, reducing red tape and, according to most Australians, cutting immigration. Practically speaking, though, Morrison’s government won’t be able to achieve all that much in coming months. The main goal for the rest of the government’s tenure should therefore be to set the stage for the next election.

Still, Morrison must avoid the old accusation of being in office but not in power. A good start would be to distinguish himself from his immediate predecessor by resonating with what John Howard once called “the decent conservative mainstream of Australia”.

That means pressing for popular ideas even if they can’t be put into law. The side that picks the issues dominates the political debate. Advantage lies with the Bully Pulpit, if the new PM will use it. Why not ramp up the culture wars?

In recent times, the progressive left has been especially noisy and polarising, using social media to push politically correct agendas around perceived racism, sexism and homophobia and denounce those with whom they disagree as morally wicked. And it is winning the battle.


Almost daily, we read about another institution -- a school or a university or a company - either promoting or pandering to a politically correct agenda in the name of “diversity”.


Even though Australia has never been more diverse, the contemporary public discourse is increasingly dominated by the cult of identity politics, which seeks to divide people along racial, gender and sexual lines.


Although identity politics is a far bigger issue in American politics, its censorious influence is growing in this country: think of the campaign to change Australia Day from January 26, or the refusal of some of our best universities to teach the history of Western civilisation to Australian students.

Morrison should rail against the tyranny of political correctness and divisive identity politics. In doing so, he should take a leaf out of Howard’s book and remind fellow citizens that defending the things that unite us all are more important in a democratic society than our differences, especially our shared freedoms of speech, thought and conscience.

In this battle, a combative Morrison would aggravate the metropolitan sophisticates, who never vote Liberal in any case. He would also be denounced as polarising, as if the present political environment is not polarising enough.

However, a counter-offensive to identity politics is likely to attract the floating voters in marginal seats in Queensland and Western Australia that the Coalition must keep and win. Nobody ever succeeded as prime minister by being liked. Being respected, capable and tough are what really matters.

The Coalition’s electoral prospects look increasingly grim. However, low expectations are a priceless political asset. If Morrison stands up for more traditional values, he will unite his party and resonate with ordinary Australians who will determine his government’s fate.


Tom Switzer is executive director of the Centre for Independent Studies and a presenter on ABC Radio National.
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PostSubject: Re: Prime Minister, Scott Morrison   Sun 26 Aug 2018, 7:44 am

Good article!

Quote :
The mainstream of conservative opinion did not believe that Malcolm Turnbull represented them and what they believed in. He was always out of kilter with them, irreparably so, and there was no point in his prolonging the agony. The party leadership and administration had its head in the sand over just how disaffected many one-time Liberals were. At the 2016 election, about a million conservatives refused to cast votes for the Liberal party.

It could happen again if Morrison doesn't do what he should do.
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PostSubject: Re: Prime Minister, Scott Morrison   Sun 26 Aug 2018, 8:44 am

Good old Larry, he does make me smile. LOL
*******************************************

SCOMO’s FIRST TEST WILL BE ABBOTT

If PM Morrison will allow Tony Abbott to bury the hatchet it will be a portent to good government and ensure the next election is a competitive affair. The next two weeks are the most important in the SCOMO tenure. He must return to the Parliament with a plan to rid us of the sewage and reinstate wasted administrative talent like Abbott.

The Education portfolio is vacant!

Dutton will remain where he is and Pyne will stay on as Manager of Government Business but both Pyne and airhead Payne must be kicked out of Defence. Marise Payne was a Turnbull appointment that made no sense other than that she was a sheila.

Her ineptness immediately became clear and little Chris Pyne was appointed to help out in an astonishing dual Senate/Reps administration. It didn’t work of course and was followed by Defence advertising free gender reassignments with complementary pink nail polish.

That must have scared the crap out of the military in Beijing, North Korea and Indonesia. Joko Bonobo must have pissed his pants in either fear or laughter.

Jim Molan is a newcomer, so will likely be overlooked, but he would be an aggressive fixer in the out of control Defence portfolio.

But an Abbott reassignment is pivotal to the success of a Morrison government. Kevin Andrews less so. The Education job is virtually vacant because Birmingham has completely stuffed up the Catholic connection and Tony, although he was a poor PM, is still a great administrator with a history in Education and God knows it needs him now that the Same Sex Marriage Lefties have morphed into weird and sick infant sex educationists. (ScoMo is against Same Sex Marriage.)

Abbott should shorten his long memory and forgive and forget that Morrison assisted his dismissal in favour of Turnbull. Abbott will want the treacherous Stick Insect gone from the plum DFAT job but he can’t win that argument.

The best he can hope for is that Morrison takes her damned cheque book from her, cancels her New York expense account and stops her ordering empty aeroplanes from Perth for mile-high encounters with boyfriends like Mr Wonderful.

As for the judicious little Jew, Josh, he needs to slowly sidle away from our insane commitment to Paris and adopt a Conservative track back to Australia’s best interests. Will he do that? I don’t know, but someone had better or the Party will face further cleavage.

Morrison should also consider recalling the half billion Turnbull gifted the Barrier Reef mob and redirect it to our debt and drought ridden farmers. Hmmm, there is so much to do after Turnbull's destructive Labor/Green policies.

I reckon, against all predictions, that ScoMo will dump Paris. He knows all about our border sovereignty that he deftly re-established after Rudd handed it to the people smugglers, so he should understand that Paris is an equally arrogant UN assault on our energy sovereignty.

Now that the ignominious maggot Mal has departed we can start to rebuild our defences against the worst of Labor's Left and the decomposing gangrenous Greens. There is finally a light ahead and we are warning ScoMo:

“Get the Party back to the sensible centre or we will hound you out of office too.”

http://pickeringpost.com/story/-scomo-s-first-test-will-be-abbott/8499
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PostSubject: Re: Prime Minister, Scott Morrison   Tue 28 Aug 2018, 10:55 am

Scott Morrison sticks to Paris climate deal

The Morrison government will resist any internal push to walk away from its commitment to the Paris climate change targets, despite it dropping emissions reduction as a consideration of energy policy.

As the Coalition reeled from another shocking poll result caused by its infighting, some conservatives, while welcoming the shift in energy policy, demanded Prime Minister Scott Morrison go further and abandon the commitment to reduce emissions by 26 per cent to 28 per cent on 2005 levels by 2030.

Senior sources said that though the government was now unsure how it would reach the targets, which were set by Tony Abbott in 2015, there could be no walking away from them.

For starters, it would jeopardise any prospect of a free trade deal with the European Union.

Attempts to stabilise the party in the aftermath of the botched coup to replace Malcolm Turnbull with Peter Dutton were on shaky ground on Monday with Mr Abbott less than enthusiastic about an offer from Mr Morrison of a junior role as an envoy for Indigenous affairs.

Labor Leader Bill Shorten said the Coalition was too unstable to govern and Mr Morrison should call an election.

"The sooner people in Australia get to have a say who is running the country, the better," he said.

Mr Abbott also drove the dissent against the National Energy Guarantee which sought to mandate reliability and emissions reduction targets for electricity retailers.
Price and reliability

Because of its emissions reduction component, the policy became the catalyst for ousting Mr Turnbull. In his ministerial reshuffle, Mr Morrison separated environment and energy, the latter going to Dutton supporter Angus Taylor, a critic of the NEG and the Renewable Energy Target.

Mr Morrison said Mr Taylor's priorities were price and reliability, not emissions reduction, and he did not rule out dumping the NEG altogether. That decision will be taken by the new cabinet when it meets. The intention is to stand firm on Paris.

But the rebels who were confident Mr Dutton would have abandoned Paris are demanding Mr Morrison do the same. Renegade Nationals MP George Christensen took to Twitter to pressure the new leader and minister.

"Looking forward to @ScottMorrisonMP & @AngusTaylorMP getting baseload underwriting scheme underway ASAP to develop new coal-fired power stations, inc one in Nth Qld. More is needed: major equity fund for new coal-fired power & abandon costly green treaties, mandates & subsidies," he wrote.

Visiting a drought-stricken farm in Queensland on Monday, Mr Morrison declined to acknowledge human-induced climate change existed, let alone was responsible for the big dry.

"Climate is changing, everybody knows that. I don't think that's part of this debate," he said.

"If people want to have a debate about that, fine. It's not a debate I've participated a lot in in the past because I'm practically interested in the policies that will address what is going on here right and now.

"I'm interested in getting people's electricity prices down and I'm not terribly interested in engaging in those sorts of debates at this point."

One senior source said  the government could let the electricity sector help reach Paris passively, given it was moving to cleaner energy, without policy guidelines. The designers of the NEG said without a 26 per cent target imposed on the sector, it would not reach that target by 2030, despite it being on track to hit 24 per cent in 2020-21, the first year of the NEG.

Mr Abbott, who helped drive the dissent that toppled Mr Turnbull, had been in line for a cabinet job had Mr Dutton prevailed. He was effectively snubbed by Mr Morrison when he unveiled his "new generation" ministry on Sunday by not even being offered the lowliest frontbench position of parliamentary secretary.

The Indigenous envoy is a non-ministerial job and Mr Abbott noted there were already many in the government with responsibility for Indigenous affairs, from the minister downwards.

"We've got a lot of people in this space, I want to know what value I can add," he told radio 2GB.

He was pushed to take the job by 2GB shock jock Ray Hadley, who campaigned to bring down Mr Turnbull.

Mr Hadley indicated Mr Morrison had rung him ahead of Mr Abbott 's interview to impress upon Mr Abbott that the envoy offer was "a fair dinkum job".

Mr Abbott did not agree.

"I had a fair dinkum job. I suspect I can manage some other things. Let's see what evolves, Ray."
'Requires authority'

Mr Abbott noted that as prime minister, he brought Indigenous affairs into his department because it "requires authority to get things done".

"It needs someone at the very top to cut through, it doesn't need someone running around at the margins," he said.

"It's something that I want to see us making a difference here but I just don't want a title without a role."

Mr Morrison said he would seek to persuade his colleague.

"Tony and I are continuing to talk about the role he can play and, as a former prime minister, I want to use his experience. I want to use his insights in an area I know he is deeply passionate about," he said.

A Newspoll published on Monday confirms the findings of last week's Fairfax/Ipsos poll in that the Coalition's support has collapsed due to its internal warfare.

Leadership spills are supposed to provide a boost in the polls but Newspoll shows Labor leading the Coalition by 56 per cent to 44 per cent, up from 51-49 two weeks ago, and Mr Shorten more popular than Mr Morrison.

"It's all up from here," Mr Abbott said.

Many in the Coalition want Mr Abbott to also retire at the election so the party can draw a line under the factional wars which have torn at it for a decade. Mr Abbott scotched any such thought.

"I am not retiring," he said.

"I still think I have a lot of public life left in me, I am determined to make the most of it."

He said despite the collapse in the Coalition's electoral fortunes "our country's in better shape than a fortnight ago.

"The whole polity is better off today."

https://www.afr.com/news/morrison-will-fight-to-stay-in--paris-climate-deal-20180826-h14jfj
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PostSubject: Re: Prime Minister, Scott Morrison   Tue 28 Aug 2018, 10:57 am

Looks like Morrison is going to be Turnbull Mk2?  He won't get the Liberal voters back, so looks like it will be PM Bull Shitten.
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PostSubject: Re: Prime Minister, Scott Morrison   Tue 28 Aug 2018, 2:29 pm

I'm willing to give him till December to get it and get his act together and the party heading in the right direction.

After that, its all over red rover.
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PostSubject: Re: Prime Minister, Scott Morrison   Tue 28 Aug 2018, 4:00 pm

I agree, early days.  However, Turnbull lost a million conservative voters at the 2016 Election, getting those back will be hard work! Volunteers at the Polling Booths, donations, etc also went down the drain, thanks to Turnbull.

Gosh, I saw a bit about the swearing in earlier, Marise Payne is a shocker in comparison to Bishop. I do wish he had gotten rid of that idiot from Adelaide, Pyne.  Yuck!
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PostSubject: Re: Prime Minister, Scott Morrison   Wed 29 Aug 2018, 9:10 am

yes Pyne is a fool....  they have at least 2 ex-military that could have taken those jobs...   Molan and Hastie.

Morrison has shown he will do nothing about immigration numbers as Treasurer his budget was based on increasing them.  Stupid because many will be on welfare for at least 5 years longer if he sends then to regional towns
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PostSubject: Re: Prime Minister, Scott Morrison   Wed 29 Aug 2018, 10:28 am

More of the same, I reckon. However, early days.

I see that Bishop is pissed off that out of the 11 who voted for her in the spill, none were from WA. Also talk about Christian Porter wanting to move into Bishop's Electorate ... it is a safer spot than the one he has, apparently.
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