AUSSIEPOLITICS

Discuss Australian politics and other general stuff
 
HomeHome  RegisterRegister  Log inLog in  

Share | 
 

 What's happening with the Liberals.

Go down 
AuthorMessage
Veritas

avatar

Posts : 482
Join date : 2018-07-17

PostSubject: What's happening with the Liberals.   Wed 22 Aug 2018, 11:13 pm

Turnbull – the infidel in Howard’s broad church
Illustration: Eric Lobbecke

  • Janet Albrechtsen


  • This is not over. There is unfinished business in the Liberal Party that guarantees another leadership spill. The rising damp of the wets in the party has left the joint with dodgy foundations. Until that is fixed, the Liberal Party will crumble further, unable to define itself, prosecute policy or win an election.




In a rude joke just over a year ago, Malcolm Turnbull claimed the ill-fitting mantle of Robert Menzies. During a speech in London, Turnbull quoted Australia’s longest serving prime minister saying in 1944: “We took the name ‘Liberal’ because we were determined to be a progressive party.”

A note from killer Susan Neill-Fraser instructing a witness to her appeal what to say was to be smuggled out of prison, a court heard.
In true Turnbull style, full of arrogance, trickery and delusion, Turnbull claimed the Liberal Party as “progressive” — coveting its modern meaning when the word had a very different meaning in 1944.

As John Howard told The Australian last year, “context is everything”. “Menzies did not say: ‘We took the name Liberal because we were determined to be progressive rather than conservative.’ ”

Turnbull’s leadership was under the gun back then, too, and instead of reaching out to conservative voters, asking them to believe in a Liberal Party led by him, he effectively told them to get nicked. And they have, moving their votes and, in many cases, their money to other people and other causes.

Turnbull is decidedly more ABC than Sky News. And though he will say speaking with Leigh Sales rather than, say, Paul Murray is all about audience reach, Turnbull should be brave enough and smart enough to reach out to both audiences. Murray’s audience is where Turnbull needs to make a mark. When you lose the base, it’s clear that you have lost your philosophical bearings. Yesterday, a good number of his parliamentary colleagues deserted him, too. Winning a leadership spill by a vote of 48 to 35 against Peter Dutton should cause Turnbull to reconsider his strategy.

The problem is not just that Turnbull’s DNA won’t allow reconsideration but that it is hard to discern any strategy to reconsider. It is day-to-day survival for Turnbull; no policy is too important not to be sacrificed.

Like Kevin Rudd, the man who said he would not lead a party without a serious climate change policy has ruined his credibility.
There is no doubt that politics has cycles and we are on the downward side. But after a decade of no prime minister serving a full term, one might look to Howard for clues to success. The man who won four elections was canny enough to front up to all kind of media, from the friendly to the downright hostile. That Dutton is the same augurs well for him.

Howard’s success reveals Turnbull’s failure. A year on from his misappropriation of Menzies, Turnbull has still ignored what Howard said: “We should always remind ourselves of who we are and where we’ve come from and what we represent. The point I want to make most strongly is that people who see themselves as conservatives should see the Liberal Party as their natural home.”

Australia’s second longest serving prime minister lived the fact that the Liberal Party is most successful when it is true to its roots as the custodian of two philosophical strands: small-L liberalism and social conservatism.

The broad church was in fine nick under Howard because he saw himself as a man among equals. He embraced small-L liberals, putting them in cabinet and respecting their views. Indeed, the broad church of the Liberal Party was at its strongest under Howard because his conservative values reflected the fact mainstream Australians across the nation shared the same values.

Turnbull has not fostered a broad church because he does not regard himself as a man among equals. That prevents him from being a team player. The leadership of the Liberal Party and the prime ministership has always been about Turnbull. He wanted to lead the nation long before he knew what he wanted to do as leader of the nation. Voters can spot a man seeking power for power’s sake. Like Rudd, again. The two men have much in common.

That said, the rush to lay the wreckage of the Liberal Party at the feet of Turnbull is misguided even if tempting. Turnbull has shown zero political nous by shunning conservatives, provoking his arch nemesis Tony Abbott, and failing to explain what the point of the Liberal Party is under his stewardship. As Prime Minister, Turnbull has vacillated when decisions were needed. He has sulked over losses when he should have taken responsibility.

By surrounding himself with men and women who are less small-L liberal and more big-L Labor in their politics on everything from climate change to big government and culture, Turnbull has hastened a rot that set in years ago. As prime minister, ­Abbott was hardly a rock-solid liberal either, fleeing from free speech and economic reform at the first whiff of grapeshot.

Howard’s broad church can survive only if its congregation is committed to the values of liberalism such as freedom of speech, religious freedom, freer markets, less government regulation and defending our history.

Dutton may be the Liberal leader to rid the party of the rising damp, returning it to a genuine broad church of small-L liberals and conservatives. But first he will have to contend with Abbott. To steal a cricket term, Dutton deserves better than being a nightwatchman for a former prime minister who will not be satisfied until he is back in office, and his former chief of staff is there too.

The Liberal Party cannot be rebuilt until the cult of personality is replaced with the prime minister being the first among equals. The Abbott v Turnbull contest is more about two men who loathe one another than it is about the future of the Liberal Party.
Back to top Go down
Neferti
Admin
avatar

Posts : 640
Join date : 2018-07-15

PostSubject: Re: What's happening with the Liberals.   Thu 23 Aug 2018, 5:23 pm

What a bloody mess! I've been watching Sky News all day.  Glad to see Turncoat will be going, one way or the other.  Ah well, tomorrow is another day.

Back to top Go down
Neferti
Admin
avatar

Posts : 640
Join date : 2018-07-15

PostSubject: Re: What's happening with the Liberals.   Thu 23 Aug 2018, 5:29 pm

I missed a couple of hours as had family call in. Just caught up!  Julie Bishop? She needs to go with Turncoat. Morrison, nope, he's like Turncoat.  I have no idea what Dutton is like but he is, apparently, a real conservative, not a pretend one.

Holy Cow.

Back to top Go down
Patriot



Posts : 64
Join date : 2018-08-14

PostSubject: Re: What's happening with the Liberals.   Thu 23 Aug 2018, 11:59 pm

Let us all pray that Peter Dutton takes over with TRUMP style actions to save Australia.
Back to top Go down
Veritas

avatar

Posts : 482
Join date : 2018-07-17

PostSubject: Re: What's happening with the Liberals.   Fri 24 Aug 2018, 5:01 pm

mals 2 pet ex-conservatives are in as PM and Deputy...  good grief.
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: What's happening with the Liberals.   

Back to top Go down
 
What's happening with the Liberals.
Back to top 
Page 1 of 1

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
AUSSIEPOLITICS :: Australian Politics-
Jump to: